Posts Tagged ‘team work’

Communications and Personality Type – Sensing & iNtuition

Sunday, March 18th, 2018
The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The Sensing and Intuition scale represents the greatest potential for communication differences between people, since it really influences one’s worldview.

And, when you remember that Sensing and Intuition are the two preferences for the cycle of behavior that has to do with Gathering INFORMATION, it’s easy to understand why the potential for confusion and chaos exists in  giving communication when you don’t understand and recognize someone’s preference.

Intuitive types are motivated by change and get enthusiastic about doing things differently and they want to share their inspirational ideas that they gained through their Intuition.  These ideas start as abstract concepts, often not too complete with details.

Sensing types may be skeptical of theoretical concepts and want to see concrete evidence that the theory presented will work.  Sensors want to hear and see specifics and factual information that is linked to reality and presented in a step-by-step format.  They will ask practical questions and will want the details or the specific steps described.

Intuitive types usually see a lot of questions as being overly limiting, nitpicky, challenging or demonstrating a lack of confidence.  When the Intuitive type is unable to ground ideas with facts and details, the Sensing type will see the information being presented as unrealistic and impractical.

Intuitive types tend to use metaphors, analogies, and other abstract language.  They use theoretical words and concepts.  Sensing types prefer to speak in language that is literal and descriptive.  These two ways of using language are quite different and can block effective communication.

Sensors in communication


  • Anchored in reality & common sense
  • Practical & realistic
  • Observant & attend to details
  • Immediately apply communication

Communication Approach

  • Seek facts, details & concrete examples
  • Like step-by-step explanations
  • Trust what has been tried & proven
  • Comfortable with familiarity & practicality

When Communicating with Sensors

  • Be practical with ideas that are down to earth
  • Present information sequentially
  • Show a plan & process for change
  • Use words that relate to sensory images

Intuitives in communication


  • Are open to possibilities
  • Anticipate & create change
  • Are future oriented – see trends
  • Generate ideas

Communication Approach

  • Become bored with details
  • Like to brainstorm
  • See patterns & the big picture
  • Don’t like to be hampered by limits

When Communicating with Intuitives

  • Provide an overview first
  • Suspend reality when brainstorming
  • Share main points, then detail
  • Show future possibilities of your ideas


Communications and Personality Type – Extravert & Introvert

Monday, January 22nd, 2018
The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

Communication is central to our life – we communicate with others every day, throughout the day. Understanding, appreciating, and accommodating personality differences in communication style can bring major success to our effectiveness as a friend, spouse, employee, supervisor, trainer, leader, and team member.

People have different preferences in the way they take in and evaluate information and their orientation to the world around them. As we develop our awareness, understanding, and appreciation of communication differences, we will reap the benefit in our relationship with others.

Extraverts are energized by lively and enthusiastic discussions, with rapid-paced conversation, and often interrupt as they elaborate on and process thoughts. Introverts are energized by quiet conversations with space for reflection and conversation pace is slower, taking time as they build thoughts and ideas internally. Extraverts’ communication approach doesn’t allow time for Introverts to reflect and then give their opinions. Extraverts like to think out loud and don’t realize that Introverts feel unable to respond quickly in a conversation, preferring to internalize the information first. Thus, the Extravert’s reaction sometimes is that the Introvert is not providing input that energizes the Extravert.

When Introverts share information, it has been carefully thought through and evaluated. When an Extravert is in the thinking out loud mode they may not give the input the full evaluation it merits. Similarly, Introverts may put too much emphasis on what is said by Extraverts, not realizing they are hearing themselves think and need to process information this way. This can cause difficulties for both preferences as Extraverts may miss valuable contributions by Introverts, and Introverts may take what Extraverts say too seriously and make decisions based on the input.

These communication differences can be especially dangerous in conflict situations, as Extraverts want to handle a situation immediately and Introverts require time to think things through before giving their ideas on possible solutions. Because each preference is requiring something the other type does not prefer, tension can increase. Extraverts can become impatient, wanting to move forward and make a decision not giving time to the Introvert’s need to process the information internally and, then, make a decision.

EXTRAVERTS –  in communication


  • Energetic & enthusiastic
  • Think out loud
  • Give a lot of information
  • Network well

Communication Approach:

  • Speak out freely in groups
  • Think out loud
  • Like to discuss lots of topics
  • Interrupt often during discussion

When Communicating with Extraverts:

  • Listen attentively
  • Be actively responsive
  • Be energetic & enthusiastic
  • Support their need to communicate

INTROVERTS  – in communication


  • Quiet, reflective presence
  • Respond carefully and thoughtfully
  • Know a few people well
  • Listen without interrupting

Communication Approach:

  • Listen more than talk
  • Talk one on one
  • Need time to reflect before responding
  • Process information internally

When Communicating with Introverts:

  • Value their need for privacy
  • Allow them time to change focus
  • Ask questions to draw them out
  • Don’t pressure for an instant response


Sensing Listening Strengths

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

“I remember all the facts and details.”                                                                                                   

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

If the gift of Intuitive listeners is that they can put wings on what you say, the gift of Sensing listeners is that they can put arms and legs on what you say.

I can’t tell you how many times my conversations with my Sensing friends have resulted in my suddenly being able to move on a problem that had me stuck in place.  After I talk to them, I know the product to buy, the service to call, the information to download, or the location to drive to.

Another gift of Sensing types is that they can often remember the facts and details that people tell them.  It means a lot to see a person six months after you’ve talked, and hear them ask, “How did that problem with your daughter come out?”

“My strengths are that I’m good at keeping track of people and what they’re doing.  It makes them feel special,” says Dan, ESTP. “For example, my friend told me a few months ago that he’s interested in a graduate program, and I asked him about that recently, and I think he liked that.”

“My strength as a listener is that I remember all the facts and details,” says Patty, ESTJ. “A client might call me back after five years and say, “Hi, I’m sure you don’t remember me, but you tested my daughter.”  I say, “Of course I remember you.”  Your daughter wore a purple sweater that day and her birthday is April 11. “I don’t do it on purpose.  It’s just that all that stuff goes in there and gets filed.”

Sensing types are also often alert to the sensory information about the speaker, so if their words don’t match their body language, Ss will probably pick up on it.

“My strength as a listener is that I notice all the sensory stuff besides their listening:  their tone of voice, the look on their face, the agitation in their bodies,” says Sharon, ISTP.  “I may not even hear the words.  Sometimes I’ll say to a person, “You said this, but everything about you says something else.”  “I might find out later that I was right that they were stressed out, even if it was about something other than what they were talking about.  That’s why I don’t like e-mails, because you can’t see or hear all the other stuff in an email.”

Another strength of some Sensing listeners, and one that is worth imitating, is their ability to ‘see’ in their minds what the person is describing.

“When people are talking to me, it’s like I’m running a movie in my mind’s eye,” says Patty, ESTJ. “I’m visualizing it, and that makes it more fun to listen, and helps me really be with the person.”

Resource: The TYPE Reporter, No. 98, The gift of Listening, Part 2