Posts Tagged ‘management training’

Feeling Listening Strengths

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

Feelings are underneath everything we convey, even if it’s news or information.  Being able to understand the feelings of people, even if they are not being discussed, is a huge plus for Feeling types when it comes to listening.   My strength as a listener

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

is that I can get inside people’s heads and know where they’re coming from,” says Marthanne, ENFJ.  “Most people experience that very positively as a blessing and a drink of water when they’re thirsty.”

When I listen to people I become like them; I’m in the ring with them,” says Craig, ENFP. “I love getting inside the head of someone and walking in their shoes,” says Janet, INFJ.  “In fact, it’s energizing for me.”

Another strength of Feeling types is that they want to please people, and if they figure out that listening is a way to please people, they have a strong desire to give the gift of listening.

“I always try to act as interested and engaged as I possibly can,” says Paul, ESFJ.  “I ask them a lot of questions, and ask myself what they are really trying to tell me.  Then, I try to share an experience that is similar, so they know they’re not the only ones who feel that way.”

“Ever since I was little, I felt like listening was one of my strengths,” says Susan, ISFJ.  “I have a lot of patience, and I really, really like people.”  I realized early on that people like talking about themselves, and if I listen, they like me.”

Source:  The TYPE Reporter- The Gift of Listening, No. 98

 

How Does Type Influence Our Listening?

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

In the last blog update, 16 people were asked the question,  “Who is the best listener in your life?” and 14 of them mentioned an Introvert!  Do Introverts really have a natural advantage over Extraverts when it comes to listening?

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

According to the type theory, Introverts have two good reasons to listen more than talk.  First of all, they have a lower need to talk because they process their thoughts internally.  They may want to share their completed thoughts with others, but that usually requires less time than thinking through something out loud. 

Second, when Introverts talk, they’re using their Auxiliary function, which is not what they’re best at, so they don’t get the positive response that Extraverts do.  After awhile, they become less confident and more critical of themselves when they speak.  The role of listener becomes a better way for them to garner self-esteem.

Extraverts, on the other hand, have two good reasons to talk more than listen.  First, they need to process their thoughts out loud.  They often do their best thinking when they are talking, so they need to have several good listeners in their lives to allow them to reach clarity and understanding.

Second, Extraverts derive greater self-esteem from talking than Introverts. Because they are Extraverts, they are showing their dominant function to the world, which is what they’re best at, whether it’s practical knowledge, possibilities, logic or caring.  When they finish speaking, they usually get a better response from others, and more of a sense of accomplishment in their speech.  It’s hard to give that up and switch over into listening.

However, just because Introverts tend to do more listening, they don’t necessarily listen well.  Although they may be silent when someone else is speaking, they may actually have a strong internal dialogue going, and may be listening more to themselves than the speaker.

Let’s face it!  It’s an effort for all of us to be good listeners.  Extraverts have to manage their external voice, and Introverts have to manage their internal voice.

In trying to become a good human being though, nothing makes a bigger difference than developing the ability to listen well.  No matter what else we do for other people, if we listen attentively and sympathetically to what they are saying, and let them know that they have been heard and understood, that will mean the most to them.

A Great Destroyer Of Teamwork – The fundamental Attribution Error

Friday, May 27th, 2016
The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

We human beings have a tendency to falsely attribute the negative behaviors of others to their character, while attributing our own negative behaviors to environmental factors.

In other words, if I see a woman being impatient with her children at the grocery store and giving

them a swat,    I think, “that is a mean woman.” While, when my own kids are driving me crazy and arguing with me  and I give them a swat, I think, “I’ve got some really unruly children.” 

We tend to like to believe that we do bad things because of the situations we are in, but somehow we assume that others do bad things because they are predisposed to being bad.

In the same way, we often attribute other people’s success to their environment and our own success to our character.  That’s because we like to believe that we are inherently good and talented, while others are merely lucky, beneficiaries of good fortune.

This fundamental attribution error often creates misunderstanding and distrust among team members.  By getting to know one another better and understanding our personality tendencies, team members can often avoid this problem.

Personality-type training can eliminate the “Fundamental Attribution Error.”

 

Explore The Benefits Of Humility In Business

Saturday, November 28th, 2015

Leadership humility is rare and doesn’t necessarily enjoy the recognition it deserves, says Wikus Van Vuuren, a director at GIMT.

The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

“Humility is unfortunately often perceived as a weakness in business when, in fact, it can be a tremendous asset.”

“Humble leaders who openly understand and develop their weaknesses and capitalize on their strengths often create environments that encourage people to grow, which in turn grows the organization,” he says.

“Some of the most successful organizations worldwide have leaders who inconspicuously stand out due to their humble nature, rather than their arrogance and flamboyance,” Van Vuuren says.

“Indeed, the leader who is humble never allows the power of his position to cloud his judgment. He respects the unique contribution individuals have to make, and does not get stuck on their perceived weaknesses,” he adds.

“One of the greatest strengths of humble leaders is that they never assume they know all the answers and allow people to explain things to them. They look for the opportunity to learn and use every opportunity to make others feel valued.”

“Apart from personal issues, there is no real harm in letting people know what you view as your strengths and weaknesses.  A good step would be to implement a system where you can get direct feedback from your executive team, your clients, your staff and even people in your personal circle. While this system will create an open and honest company culture, it will also contribute significantly to your own personal growth.”

Van Vuuren says you should connect with your manager, peers and those that report to you.  “You will make them feel more comfortable about exploring their own opportunities for development.”

“Honest leaders are also good listeners,” he says.  “Do you have a tendency, when someone starts explaining something, to interrupt them to make sure they know that you already know what they are talking about? The next time this happens, try something new. Listen. Let them finish their explanation.”

“Ask lots of questions, validate them, then add your comments.”

“In the act of being humble, you make others feel important and valued,” Van Vuuren said.

“That is the gift of the humble leader. Besides, it is more refreshing and empowering being around humble people than inflated egos.”

(Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a trademark or registered trademark of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Trust in the United States and other countries.)

Communications and Personality Type – Judging & Perceiving

Saturday, November 21st, 2015
The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

The fourth behavior dimension – how we take Action – Judging or Perceiving – J/P  is vital to understand about one another because it is related to how we like to organize our world.   Judging types prefer to decide and Perceiving types prefer to explore options. Judging types feel tension until they make a decision and Perceiving types feel tension when they feel pushed into making a decision too quickly.

Communication difficulties are created between Judging and Perceiving types around the time frame for completing a project. Perceiving types often start tasks at the last minute because they are intent on gathering as much data as possible that may impact their decision and Judging types are likely to complete tasks ahead of time. Because the Judging types are focused on the deadline, they find it difficult to trust that the Perceiving types will meet the deadline.

Judging types like to plan and organize their work in a systematic manner. They rely on this structure to be able to have a feeling of accomplishment and moving forward. Perceiving types approach a project by starting at one point and making decisions along the way as they find out information and move forward. Stress can be created when Judging and Perceiving types work together unless they understand each other’s preferred style.  A knowledge of the strengths of Judging types and Perceiving types can eliminate a lot of miscommunication.

Judging Types in communication

Strengths  – Just do it!

  • Are decisive
  • Share info and move forward
  • Well organized & efficient communicators
  • Provide timelines

Communication Approach:

  • Quickly make decisions, provide closure
  • Punctual & expect others to be on time
  • Like structure and schedule
  • Like to have control

When Communicating with Judgers:

  • Decide as quickly as possible
  • Focus on what is most important
  • Narrow & focus your options before sharing
  • Create & share timelines

Perceiving Types in communication

Strengths  – Have we researched this enough?

  • Flexible & adaptable
  • Open to new information
  • Create & consider lots of options
  • Easygoing approach to change

Communication Approach:

  • Include lots of data in decision-making
  • Spontaneous communication style
  • Can postpone decisions
  • See opportunity in interruptions

When Communicating with Perceivers:

  • Allow discussion time & plan for changes
  • Establish mutual deadlines
  • Seek more information before deciding
  • Be open to communication opportunities

 

Feeling Listening Strengths

Saturday, September 26th, 2015

Feelings are underneath everything we convey, even if it’s news or information.  Being able to understand the feelings of people, even if they are not being discussed, is a huge plus for Feeling types when it comes to listening.

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

My strength as a listener is that I can get inside people’s heads and know

where they’re coming from,” says Marthanne, ENFJ.  “Most people experience that very positively as a blessing and a drink of water when they’re thirsty.”

When I listen to people I become like them; I’m in the ring with them,” says Craig, ENFP. “I love getting inside the head of someone and walking in their shoes,” says Janet, INFJ.  “In fact, it’s energizing for me.”

Another strength of Feeling types is that they want to please people, and if they figure out that listening is a way to please people, they have a strong desire to give the gift of listening.

“I always try to act as interested and engaged as I possibly can,” says Paul, ESFJ.  “I ask them a lot of questions, and ask myself what they are really trying to tell me.  Then, I try to share an experience that is similar, so they know they’re not the only ones who feel that way.”

“Ever since I was little, I felt like listening was one of my strengths,” says Susan, ISFJ.  “I have a lot of patience, and I really, really like people.”  I realized early on that people like talking about themselves, and if I listen, they like me.”

Source:  The TYPE Reporter- The Gift of Listening, No. 98

How Does Type Influence Our Listening?

Friday, September 4th, 2015
The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

In the last blog update, 16 people were asked the question,  “Who is the best listener in your life?” and 14 of them mentioned an Introvert!  Do Introverts really have a natural advantage over Extraverts when it comes to listening?

According to the type theory, Introverts have two good reasons to listen more than talk.  First of all, they have a lower need to talk because they process their thoughts internally.  They may want to share their completed thoughts with others, but that usually requires less time than thinking through something out loud.

Second, when Introverts talk, they’re using their Auxiliary function, which is not what they’re best at, so they don’t get the positive response that Extraverts do.  After awhile, they become less confident and more critical of themselves when they speak.  The role of listener becomes a better way for them to garner self-esteem.

Extraverts, on the other hand, have two good reasons to talk more than listen.  First, they need to process their thoughts out loud.  They often do their best thinking when they are talking, so they need to have several good listeners in their lives to allow them to reach clarity and understanding.

Second, Extraverts derive greater self-esteem from talking than Introverts. Because they are Extraverts, they are showing their dominant function to the world, which is what they’re best at, whether it’s practical knowledge, possibilities, logic or caring.  When they finish speaking, they usually get a better response from others, and more of a sense of accomplishment in their speech.  It’s hard to give that up and switch over into listening.

However, just because Introverts tend to do more listening, they don’t necessarily listen well.  Although they may be silent when someone else is speaking, they may actually have a strong internal dialogue going, and may be listening more to themselves than the speaker.

Let’s face it!  It’s an effort for all of us to be good listeners.  Extraverts have to manage their external voice, and Introverts have to manage their internal voice.

In trying to become a good human being though, nothing makes a bigger difference than developing the ability to listen well.  No matter what else we do for other people, if we listen attentively and sympathetically to what they are saying, and let them know that they have been heard and understood, that will mean the most to them.

“I Can’t Decide What Type I Am!” – Part 2

Friday, July 31st, 2015
The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

OTHER REASONS PEOPLE CAN’T DECIDE ON THEIR TYPE 

When people can’t decide on a type for themselves, it’s sometimes because they are young. “With a young group, I always tell them that it’s common for people to be exploring at this time, and not to take the MBTI results too seriously,” says Naomi Quenk, INFP, psychologist and past president of the Association for Psychological Type.

Or, they may not be young, but still be inexperienced. They may not have had many challenging experiences yet, like a job, or starting their own family, that would bring them face to face with their assets and liabilities. “Many of the people who come out mid-range on most of the scales of the MBTI and Type Differentiation Indicator,” says Don Johnson, ENFP and organizational consultant with ORA in New Jersey, “are usually being seen because they are searching for a job. They haven’t gotten to first base yet. They don’t know who they are and generally have low self-esteem.”

Another influence that can confuse a person trying to choose a type, is the place or the situation, they are in. If it is not affirming of their type, they may be playing roles to remain there. “You don’t know how much influence your job has had on you,” says Margaret Hartzler, ENFJ and president of Type Resources in Gaithersburg, Maryland. “It’s possible to please people but still stay true to yourself. But it’s also possible to decide that you’d better change. For example, Fs and Ps in business settings are often confused and think they’re really Ts or Js.”

Another influence, and a very strong one, is the people who have mattered the most to you, your parents. “As a child, you live in the land of the giants,” says Mary McCaulley, INFP and president of The Center for Applications of Psychological Type. “They can break your world in two. If they are misreading you, you tend to believe them.”

“Parents can give children three kinds of messages,” says Katherine Myers, INFP, trainer and consultant in psychological type, “to be what you are, to be something you’re not, or mixed messages, where one day you’re OK and the next day you’re not, with the same behavior. Parents who give mixed messages are usually under stress themselves. When they are rested and on top of things, they’re more accepting. Other days it’s like go home and kick the dog.”

“Initially, there are usually some people who can’t decide on one or two dimensions,” says Jean Kummerow, ESTJ, psychologist and co-author of Lifetypes (Warner, 1989). “But after reading more and giving it more time, things fall into place for them. However, about 3 in 100 people can’t decide after a long period of time. When they do seek further help (and it’s mostly the NFs who do that, since they’re usually the most interested in self-knowledge), I’ve noticed a pattern of difficult childhoods, often with chemically dependent family members. As children, they didn’t get consistent messages from their parents. They tried everything to get the approval of their parents, and kept switching, and now they don’t know who they are.”

The TYPE Reporter, Excerpt from Vol. 5, No. 3
written by Susan Scanlon
(Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a trademark or registered trademark of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Trust in the United States and other countries.)

A Great Destroyer Of Teamwork – The Fundamental Attribution Error

Friday, July 10th, 2015

We human beings have a tendency to falsely attribute the negative behaviors of others to their character,

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

The PEOPLE Process Training Manual & Participant Package

while attributing our own negative behaviors to environmental factors.

In other words, if I see a woman being impatient with her children at the grocery store and giving them a swat, I think, “that is a mean woman.” While, when my own kids are driving me crazy and arguing with me and I give them a swat, I think, “I’ve got some really unruly children.”

We tend to like to believe that we do bad things because of the situations we are in, but somehow we assume that others do bad things because they are predisposed to being bad.

In the same way, we often attribute other people’s success to their environment and our own success to our character.  That’s because we like to believe that we are inherently good and talented, while others are merely lucky, beneficiaries of good fortune.

This fundamental attribution error often creates misunderstanding and distrust among team members.  By getting to know one another better and understanding our personality tendencies, team members can often avoid this problem.

Personality-type training can eliminate the “Fundamental Attribution Error.”

Explore the Benefits of Humility in Business

Friday, January 2nd, 2015
The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

The PEOPLE Process Type Wheel

Leadership humility is rare and doesn’t necessarily enjoy the recognition it deserves, says Wikus Van Vuuren, a director at GIMT.  “Humility is unfortunately often perceived as a weakness in business when, in fact, it can be a tremendous asset.”

“Humble leaders who openly understand and develop their weaknesses and capitalize on their strengths often create environments that encourage people to grow, which in turn grows the organization,” he says.

“Some of the most successful organizations worldwide have leaders who inconspicuously stand out due to their humble nature, rather than their arrogance and flamboyance,” Van Vuuren says.

“Indeed, the leader who is humble never allows the power of his position to cloud his judgment. He respects the unique contribution individuals have to make, and does not get stuck on their perceived weaknesses,” he adds.

“One of the greatest strengths of humble leaders is that they never assume they know all the answers and allow people to explain things to them. They look for the opportunity to learn and use every opportunity to make others feel valued.”

Apart from personal issues, there is no real harm in letting people know what you view as your strengths and weaknesses.  A good step would be to implement a system where you can get direct feedback from your executive team, your clients, your staff and even people in your personal circle. While this system will create an open and honest company culture, it will also contribute significantly to your own personal growth.

Van Vuuren says you should connect with your manager, peers and those that report to you.  “You will make them feel more comfortable about exploring their own opportunities for development.”

“Honest leaders are also good listeners,” he says.  “Do you have a tendency, when someone starts explaining something, to interrupt them to make sure they know that you already know what they are talking about? The next time this happens, try something new. Listen. Let them finish their explanation.”

“Ask lots of questions, validate them, then add your comments.”

“In the act of being humble, you make others feel important and valued,” Van Vuuren said.

“That is the gift of the humble leader. Besides, it is more refreshing and empowering being around humble people than inflated egos.”

(Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is a trademark or registered trademark of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Trust in the United States and other countries.)