Archive for September, 2009

HOW TO SELL TO Ts – (Thinkers)

Monday, September 28th, 2009

(The TYPE Reporter, Excerpts from Vol. 4 No. 4 September 1989, written by Susan Scanlon, and information gathered from Susan Brock, a licensed consulting psychologist, and the workshops Ms. Brock created on Flex Selling.)

www.typereporter.com

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Be businesslike.? Be friendly, but remember, the point isn?t to be friends, it?s to get the job done.? Don?t ask personal questions, like ?How do you like your job in marketing?? or try to show what a likable person you are.? Save the small talk until the business has been taken care of to their satisfaction and they are sold on your product.? And, don?t bother telling them what other people think of your product.? Listen to their needs and get right to your product?s objective merit based on those needs.

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Sell STs the facts

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Let the facts speak for themselves.? Don?t make vague statements about the quality of your product, or try to bluff the facts.? Give them evidence that it has been tested, and proven to work.? Let them try the actual product whenever you can, and let that speak for itself.

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STs like to test you to see if you know as much about the competition as they do, so be sure you can give them a factual and specific comparison of your product and the competition?s.? But be sure your figures are accurate.? If they can?t trust your facts, they can?t trust you.

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Listen for the facts that they consider to be most important.? For example, if they tell you up front that they want tax deferredness in their investment, or gas heat in a new home, don?t treat that as a minor point or try to steer them away from it.? Help them get a sense that they know all the important facts and together you have covered all the bases.

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Be responsible ? and treat their responsibilities as important.? Do you mean what you say?? Do you remember what you said?? Is your word your bond?? STs have a strong sense of responsibility and they prize it in others.? Tell them what you are going to do and then do it.? If you make a mistake, or can?t keep your word, get on the phone right away, come clean, and tell them what you are doing to correct it.? Listen between the lines for what they consider their responsibilities to be, like staying within budget, and make that an important feature of what you are selling.

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Be brief.? Susan Brock said that when she talked to STs she reminded herself to ?sharpen up and shut up.?? Answer their questions directly.? Don?t tell stories, or give speculations, or ?go round the block to get into the back door.?? Don?t overwhelm them with a million pieces of data.? STs will often use short, clipped sentences, especially during initial conversations.? Your sentences should be short as well.? Expect crisp answers, even to open-ended questions.

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Be sequential.? Give your presentation a clear beginning, middle and end.? Don?t summarize up front, or wait until the end to give the most basic stuff.? Tell them the steps involved in the implementation, and when each step will be completed.? Have a clear point in mind before you speak and make sure that it?s an important one.

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Sell NTs the options

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Give them an overview.? This is helpful with all Intuitives, but with NTs it?s critical.? Before NTs choose a product, they want to satisfy themselves that they understand where that product would be positioned in a large overview of the market.? Outline your presentation up front.? For example:? ?There are four issues to consider when investing,? or ?Home additions come under three major headings??

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Consider the long term.? NTs are likely to ask ?what if? questions, like ?What if I decide someday that I want to add this on, or change this, or get rid of this.?? An important feature of your product will be how it can adjust to changing circumstances or needs in the future.

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Learn how to be ?critiqued.?? NTs tend to pick things apart and look for flaws in the information you give them.? Don?t take these critiques personally.? Defend your arguments on logical grounds, but don?t act defensive or put down their logic.? Consider it an opening for thoughtful dialogue.? If you don?t have an answer for them right on the spot, say that.? But be willing to offer some possible answers and listen to the possible answers they present.

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NTs are testing not only your product, but you.? They want to know if you are competent.? Have you thought about your product from all angles, tested it, and had experience with it.? Are you yourself able to keep cool under fire, to think of new ideas on the spot, and to persevere when you believe in something.

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Let them come up with the final design. ?Offer them the alternatives and the appropriate data to evaluate those alternatives. both present and long term, but give them room to make it their own.? You can say ?Here are three basic directions to consider.? ?(Never say, ?This is the one for you.?)? Then be ready to hear them give you a fourth direction!

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When selling to STs, give them specific facts about how your product is superior to the competition?s.

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?Let?s start with the gas cylinder that operates the mechanism.? Most manufacturers guarantee theirs one year?Allied guarantees its products for five.? The foam is top grade, with a fifteen year ? not the usual ten ? rating.? And the back support, which you can tell when you sit down, is a bit more pronounced.? It gives better support.? We can have a floor model here tomorrow for you to try out.??

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When selling to NTs, explain all the options and give them appropriate data to evaluate those options.

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?Obtaining higher yields can be achieved in a variety of ways??

HOW TO SELL TO Fs – (Feelers)

Thursday, September 24th, 2009

(The TYPE Reporter, Excerpts from Vol. 4 No. 4 September 1989, written by Susan Scanlon, and information gathered from Susan Brock, a licensed consulting psychologist, and the workshops Ms. Brock created on Flex Selling.)

www.typereporter.com

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Be like a friend, and like a friend, make it clear that you are there for them, and they can go to you anytime they need help with the product.? Don?t act as if the only thing that matters is the product and its merits.? Engage briefly in small talk to get to know a little bit about the human being and let them get to know you.? You can compliment something about them or around them that deserves complimenting.? Smile, and match their warmth.? Don?t be afraid to ask personal questions, or use personal pronouns like ?you?, ?we? and ?our.?? When appropriate, arrange for meetings in casual settings, like over lunch, where the conversation can be more informal.? Be prepared to describe the objective merits of your product; they?ll want that, but after they feel friendly and comfortable with you.? Then, when selling your product, be aware that Fs are concerned with what other people think and need.? Take the needs and opinions of the other people that they mention seriously.

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Sell SFs the service

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Treat loyalty as important, yours and theirs.? Let them know that when they buy your product, you?ll be loyally available to answer their questions or service the product.? If they have been patrons for awhile, let them know that you value their loyalty.? Be careful about putting down the competition if the SF client has been using them for years.? They will feel a sense of loyalty toward them, and will need to defend them.? Instead, tell them that the competition is good, but demonstrate that you are even more in tune with their personal needs, and more willing to go the extra mile for them.? SFs tend to go beyond what is expected of them in a relationship, and they prize that quality in others.? If you do something extra for them, like get it delivered in time for a special event, or help them in some way that you don?t get direct financial rewards for, they will see that as a sign of your loyalty, and give you their loyalty in return.

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Treat their network as important.? When they talk, listen for the names of the people they mention and remember them.? Point out the appeal of your product to those people as well as others the client values.? For example, ?This stove has its controls out of reach of children.?? Try to find a way that you are connected to their network:? ?Oh, you deal with Harris and Brook.? I?ve been working with them for twelve years.? Tell them stories about or give them testimony from other people whose similar needs have been met by your product or service, especially if it?s people they might know, or have other things in common with.

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Stress simplicity.? Don?t get into the big picture or the theoretical side of your product.? SFs see that as showing off and over-complexifying things.? For example, don?t explain the workings of a computer and how it?s going to change the future when all they want to know is what buttons to push to call up a record on a current client.? If there are three basic steps, don?t give them all the substeps.? Unless they ask for more, tell them only the essential information they need to gain immediate practical benefit and minimal disruption.

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Let them do it.? Whenever possible, let them try it, see it, hear it, get their hands on it, say it, or taste it.? Take things a step at a time and provide examples, demonstrations, or the real thing for every important point.

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Sell NFs their own dreams

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Do what counselors do.? Help them find the answers that lie within them.? Get them to imagine out loud.? Ask them ?what if? questions like ?What if you could have the ideal office, computer, car, etc., what would it look like?? Let them fantasize and idealize.? Listen carefully as they delve into and discover their own needs.? Then help them articulate what the core element of their dream is.? ?It sounds like most of all you want an office that is conducive to conversations.? Is that about right??

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Also, like counselors do, take their doubts and hesitations seriously.? Help them articulate what bothers them, and don?t go ahead until their questions and concerns have been addressed.

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Brainstorm with them.? Next, point out the ways that your services might make their dreams come true.? NFs love to hear that their fantasies are possible, or that at least the most important elements of them are possible.? But do it as a suggestion.? For example:? ?As I was listening to you, it reminded me of an arrangement like this??

The word ?suggestion? is emphasized because NFs want to have a hand in the original concept, and enjoy the process of people bouncing ideas off of each other, each idea making the ideal more clear, and its realization more possible.

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Don?t play games with them.? NFs don?t like to play games because games mean winners and losers, and NFs prefer cooperative efforts.? They want to think that you are both on the same team working together to accomplish something.? Be honest about yourself and your product.? It?s unlikely that you?ll fool them anyway because they?re very good at sensing insincerity.

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Don?t try to make your points in sequence.? NFs think associatively, that is, they go on a ?that reminds me of this? kind of path and it?s best to let the conversation flow unstructured, giving information when the conversation leads right into it.

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NFs get annoyed if they hear you following a numerical outline in your head, although they don?t mind sitting back at the end of the conversation and summarizing.? Wait till the end, and together you can apply logic and order to the information that was covered.

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When selling to SFs, let them know that when they buy your product or service, they are also buying knowledgeable, friendly people who are eager to help them.

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?We take real pride in making sure once we?ve sold something and delivered it, that it?s also functioning.? It?s no good unless you?re happy with it.? So if the service person you call can?t help you right then and there, they?ll get back to you within a half hour or, at the latest, at the end of the same day.??

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When selling to NFs, consider yourself part of a brainstorming team, bouncing ideas off of each other.

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?As we?ve talked, I?ve found myself toying with a novel idea??

PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPE AND HOW IT BENEFITS AN ORGANIZATION

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Psychological type is a theory of personality developed by Swiss psychiatrist Dr. Carl G. Jung to explain the normal differences between healthy people.? Jung concluded that differences in behavior result from people?s inborn tendencies to use their minds in different ways.? Jung?s type theory defines patterns of normal behavior, or types, and gives an explanation of how types develop.?

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The mother and daughter team of Myers & Briggs further developed Jung?s theory creating the Myers Briggs Type Indicator, a self-report questionnaire designed to make Jung?s theory of psychological types understandable and useful in everyday life.? After more than 50 years of research and development, the MBTI is the most widely used instrument with more than two million indicators administered annually in the United States.

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The PEOPLE Process?takes type theory a step further making it ?useable?, simplifying the understanding and application of what often is a complicated process for people to work with.? With all of the breadth and depth of the theory of Dr. Carl Jung and the MBTI, The PEOPLE Process Wheel takes the theory of the four behavioral dimensions of how Energy is focused, how Information is gathered, how Decisions are made and how Action is taken and makes them easy to remember and use.? Within each behavioral dimension, are two opposite poles ? preferences ? for which everyone has a natural preference (inborn strength) for one of the two opposites in each of the four behavioral dimensions.

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As we use our preferences, we develop what the research defines as our psychological type:? an underlying personality pattern resulting from the dynamic interaction of our four preferences, environmental influences and our own choices.? People tend to develop behaviors, skills, and attitudes associated with their type, and those with types that differ from yours, will likely be opposite you in many ways.? Each type represents a valuable and reasonable way to be.? Each type has its own potential strengths, as well as its likely blind spots.?

Psychological type has been applied as a tool for many years by a variety of users including those in:

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  • Small businesses and large multinational corporations
  • Service industries and manufacturing concerns
  • Consulting and training services
  • Government at all levels
  • Established firms and new entrepreneurial ventures
  • Educational and health-care institutions

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In general, psychological type functions as a tool that helps people in organizations:

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  • Understand themselves and their behaviors
  • Appreciate others so as to make constructive use of individual differences
  • Approach problems in different yet healthy ways and thus be more productive

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Specifically, organizations use type to:

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  • Make the most of their human resources
  • Leverage individuals? natural strengths
  • Improve teamwork
  • Understand and adapt to differences in leadership/management style
  • Enhance effective communications between supervisors, peers, employees, and customers
  • Assist in career development
  • Resolve conflict
  • Coach individuals
  • Design training activities
  • Recognize employees’ unique contributions
  • Develop skills in creativity, time management, and stress management

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The Five Relationship Management Attributes Necessary for Successful Leadership

Monday, September 7th, 2009

Leadership is the ability to inspire and motivate others.? Each one of us is required to exhibit leadership capabilities every day, in our professional and personal lives ? a mother inspiring her children to do their best in school; an HR Manager attempting to lift the morale of the company; a politician asking for our vote; a president of a corporation asking management to increase productivity.? It doesn?t matter what the size of the organization is, understanding your personal leadership strengths can assist in accomplishing your goals.

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In a study of Leadership, Emotional Intelligence and Personality Type conducted in 2004 by Richmond, Rollin and Brown, the findings were:

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  • The five most important leadership attributes were identified as Vision, Strategic Thinking, Relationship Building, Execution and People Development.

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  • Emotional Intelligence attributes are essential to successful leadership, especially the ?relationship management? attributes ? Vision, Relationship Building and People Development.

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  • Of the remaining attributes, all the Emotional Intelligence competencies are more important than all the general leadership attributes, such as External/market Orientation, Financial Acumen, and Planning.

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The Center for Creative Leadership in studying why managers derail on their way to becoming executives found four themes that emerged:

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??????????? 1.???????? Problems with interpersonal relationships

??????????? 2.???????? Failure to meet business objectives

??????????? 3.???????? Failure to build and lead a team

??????????? 4.? ?????? Inability to change or adapt during a transition

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In short, difficulties with ?relationship management? attributes (vision, relationship building and people development) were identified as prime contributors to the failure of otherwise promising executive careers.

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Personality Type and Leadership

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The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator identifies common differences among normal people.? ?The essence of the theory is that much seemingly random variation in behavior is actually quite orderly and consistent? based on differences in the way individuals prefer to perceive information and reach conclusions (Myers, et al, 1998).?

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Research shows that personality type explains some of the variation in leadership behavior and perceived effectiveness.? A brief summary includes:

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  • Leaders come from all 16 personality types, however, nearly every study of leaders by type finds TJs over-represented relative to other types.

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  • Research shows that leaders of different types focus on different aspects of their roles and also choose to handle the same activities differently.

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Leadership studies usually indicate that most corporate leaders exhibit TJ preferences.? For example, 58% of participants in Center for Creative Leadership programs prefer TJ (MBTI Manual, p. 327).? TJ leaders ?are considered tough minded, executive, analytical?leaders who communicate their confidence in the?primacy of focusing on logical outcomes.? TJs may be seen by others as?too quick to judge and act, and tactless in their style of communication?? (MBTI Manual, pps. 52-53).

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Implications of these studies for Leaders

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Leaders can use the findings from the above studies to gain the following insights into what their executives, and peers may be expecting from them:

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  • Assess and increase your effectiveness in building relationships, developing people, and thinking strategically.

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  • To excel at the highly-ranked ?relationship management? attributes, develop your Emotional Intelligence capabilities such as Self-Awareness, Empathy, and Adaptability.

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  • Consider your effectiveness in providing vision and inspiration, executing work to plan, taking initiative, and fostering teamwork.

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  • When seeking to influence others, be aware of differences in what each of you values in leaders.?

?Leadership Styles of the 16 Personality Types – Motivates Others by:

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ISTJ

Providing precise, accurate and timely information

ISFJ

Presenting factual information personally to influence people to understand the job that needs to be done

INTJ

Describing end result desired, by connecting actions, intentions and desired outcomes

INFJ

Building enduring relationships through cooperation and acting on values that promote well-being

ISTP

Using tangible goals to get things moving

INTP

Talking about theory and discussing outcomes

ISFP

Encouraging others to take action in an easy-going manner

INFP

Creating alternative solutions

ESTP

Quickly acting to solve problems for others

ESFP

Relating to people at a personal level to get them involved

ENTP

Using their problem-solving skills

ENFP

Engaging with others to share ideas, & brainstorming

ESTJ

Using specific facts and a systematic method

ENTJ

Systematic & logical action; ideas and global issues

ESFJ

Practical, hands-on action, moving toward completion of a project

ENFJ

Energizing with their ?assertive? and personable nature

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Knowing yourself well and understanding how others function is fundamental to building strong relationships and effective leadership.? Leadership is about behavior and the psychology of leadership as theorized by psychological type allows individuals to recognize their demonstrated behaviors as expressions of their type and to apply type theory as a way to enhance leader development.

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Clearly, based on the stated desired leadership qualities, it?s easy to understand the importance a thorough knowledge of personality type can provide.? Type is about ?relationship management? and ?people development.?? To understand and apply type theory is to be able to motivate and lead others ? including ourselves.

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